Artboard 2 copy 35Artboard 64 copy 13Artboard 2 copy 19Artboard 2 copy 31Artboard 64 copy 18Artboard 64 copy 10Artboard 64 copy 11Artboard 64 copy 15Artboard 64 copy 12Artboard 64 copy 13Artboard 64 copy 14Artboard 2 copy 34Artboard 64 copy 19Artboard 64 copy 16MinusArtboard 2 copy 44Artboard 2 copy 38Artboard 2 copy 36PlusArtboard 64 copy 17Artboard 2 copy 43Artboard 2 copy 45Artboard 2 copy 46Artboard 64 copy 16Artboard 64 copy 18Artboard 64 copy 19Artboard 64 copy 17

Experimental systemic contact dermatitis from nickel: a dose-response study

Tidsskriftartikel - 2003

Resume

Systemic contact dermatitis is usually seen as flare-up of previous dermatitis or de novo dermatitis similar to allergic contact dermatitis. Although systemic contact dermatitis from medicaments is a well-established entity, the existence of clinically relevant systemic reactions to oral nickel exposure, in particular systemic reactions to nickel in the daily diet, remains controversial. Several studies have shown that oral exposure to nickel can induce systemic contact dermatitis in nickel-sensitive individuals. In most of these studies, however, the exposure dose of nickel used has been considerably higher than the nickel content in the normal daily diet. The aim of the current investigation was to study dose-response dependency of oral exposure to nickel. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled oral exposure trial, 40 nickel-sensitive persons and 20 healthy (non-nickel-sensitive) controls were given nickel sulfate hexahydrate in doses similar to and greater than the amount of nickel ingested in the normal Danish daily diet. The nickel content in urine and serum before and after oral exposure was measured to determine nickel uptake and excretion. The influence of the amount of nickel ingested on the clinical reactions to oral exposure and on nickel concentrations in serum and urine was evaluated. Among nickel-sensitive individuals, a definite dose-response dependency was seen, following oral exposure to nickel. 7 of 10 nickel-sensitive individuals had cutaneous reactions to oral exposure to 4.0 mg nickel, an amount approximately 10 times greater than the estimated normal daily dietary intake of nickel. 4 of 10 nickel-sensitive individuals had cutaneous reactions to 1.0 mg nickel, a dose which is close to the estimated maximum amount of nickel contained in the daily diet. 4 of 10 nickel-sensitive individuals reacted to 0.3 mg nickel or to the amount equivalent to that contained in a normal daily diet, and 1 of 10 reacted to a placebo. None of the 20 healthy controls had cutaneous reactions to 4.0 mg nickel or to a placebo. Prior to oral exposure, there was no measurable difference in the amount of nickel in the urine or serum of nickel-sensitive persons and healthy controls. Following the oral challenge, the nickel content in the urine and serum of both nickel-sensitive and healthy control individuals was directly related to the dose of nickel ingested.

Reference

Jensen C, Menné T, Lisby S, Kristiansen J, Veien N. Experimental systemic contact dermatitis from nickel: a dose-response study. Contact Dermatitis 2003;49:124-132.
doi: 10.1111/j.0105-1873.2003.00157.x

Gå til Tidsskriftartikel