Artboard 2 copy 35Artboard 64 copy 13Artboard 2 copy 19Artboard 2 copy 31Artboard 64 copy 18Artboard 64 copy 10Artboard 64 copy 11Artboard 64 copy 15Artboard 64 copy 12Artboard 64 copy 13Artboard 64 copy 14Artboard 2 copy 34Artboard 64 copy 19Artboard 64 copy 16MinusArtboard 2 copy 44Artboard 2 copy 38Artboard 2 copy 36PlusArtboard 64 copy 17Artboard 2 copy 43Artboard 2 copy 45Artboard 2 copy 46Artboard 64 copy 16Artboard 64 copy 18Artboard 64 copy 19Artboard 64 copy 17

Agreement of offspring-reported parental smoking status: The RHINESSA generation study

Tidsskriftartikel - 2019

Resume

BACKGROUND: With increasing interest in exposure effects across generations, it is crucial to assess the validity of information given on behalf of others.

AIMS: To compare adult's report of their parent's smoking status against parent's own report and examine predictors for discrepant answers.

METHODS: We studied 7185 offspring (18-51 years) and one of their parents, n = 5307 (27-67 years) participating in the Respiratory Health in Northern Europe, Spain and Australia (RHINESSA) generation study. Information about parent's smoking status during offspring's childhood and mother's smoking status during pregnancy was obtained by questionnaires from parents and their offspring. We calculated sensitivity, specificity and Cohen's Kappa [κ] for agreement using parent's own report as the gold standard. We performed logistic regression to examine if offspring's sex, age, educational level, asthma status, own smoking status or parental status, as well as the parent's sex and amount of smoking during childhood predicted disagreement.

RESULTS: The sensitivity for offspring's correct report of parent's smoking status during childhood (0-10 years) was 0.82 (95% CI 0.81-0.84), specificity was 0.95 (95% CI 0.95-0.96) and a good agreement was observed, κ = 0.79 (95% CI 0.78-0.80). Offspring's report of mothers' smoking status during pregnancy showed a lower sensitivity, 0.66 (95% CI 0.60-0.71), a slightly lower specificity, 0.92 (95% CI 0.90-0.95) and a good agreement, κ = 0.61 (95% CI 0.55-0.67). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, offspring not having children was a predictor for discrepant answers (odds ratio [OR] 2.11 [95% CI 1.21-3.69]). Low amount of parents' tobacco consumption, < 10 cigarettes/day (OR 2.72 [95% CI 1.71-4.31]) also predicted disagreement compared to ≥10 cigarettes per day, and so did offspring's reports of fathers' smoking status (OR 1.73 [95% CI 1.09-2.74]) compared to mothers' smoking status. Offspring's sex, asthma status, educational level, smoking status or age was not related to discrepant answers.

CONCLUSIONS: Adults report their parent's smoking status during their childhood, as well as their mother' smoking status when pregnant with them, quite accurately. In the absence of parents' direct report, offspring's reports could be valuable.

Reference

Pape K, Svanes C, Malinovschi A, Benediktsdottir B, Lodge C, Janson C, Moratalla J, Sánchez-Ramos JL, Bråbäck L, Holm M, Jögi R, Bertelsen RJ, Sigsgaard T, Johannessen A, Schlünssen V. Agreement of offspring-reported parental smoking status: The RHINESSA generation study. BMC Public Health 2019;19:94.
doi: 10.1186/s12889-019-6414-0

Gå til Tidsskriftartikel