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The importance of individual preferences when evaluating the associations between working hours and indicators of health and well-being

Tidsskriftartikel - 2010

Resume

Previous studies indicate that the effect of a given shift schedule may depend on individual factors. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether a misfit between individual preferences and actual working hours affected the association between working hours and self-reported indicators of health and well-being. The study population consisted of 173 female eldercare workers who mainly worked day or evening shifts. We combined self-reported questionnaire data on preferences with actual work schedules during a four-week period. The study showed that a misfit between preferences on one hand and "non-day work", "weekend work" or "only a few consecutive days off" on the other hand was associated with an increased dissatisfaction with working hours and/or an increase in the intention to leave the workplace due to one's working hours.

Reference

Nabe-Nielsen K, Kecklund G, Ingre M, Skotte JH, Diderichsen F, Garde AH. The importance of individual preferences when evaluating the associations between working hours and indicators of health and well-being. Applied Ergonomics 2010;41(6):779-786.

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