Commentary: The chronic inhalation study in rats for assessing lung cancer risk may be better than its reputation

Tidsskriftartikel - 2019

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Recently, Borm and Driscoll published a commentary discussing grouping of Poorly Soluble particles of Low Toxicity (PSLTs) and the use of rats as an animal model for human hazard assessment of PSLTs (Particle and Fibre Toxicology (2019) 16(1):11). The commentary was based on the scientific opinion of several international experts on these topics. The general conclusion from the authors was a cautious approach towards using chronic inhalation studies in rats for human hazard assessment of PSLTs. This was based on evidence of inhibition of particle clearance leading to overload in the rats after high dose exposure, and a suggested over reactivity of rat lung cancer responses compared to human risk.As a response to the commentary, we here discuss evidence from the scientific literature showing that a) diesel exhaust particles, carbon black nanoparticles and TiO2 nanoparticles have similar carcinogenic potential in rats, and induce lung cancer at air concentrations below the air concentrations that inhibit particle clearance in rats, and b) chronic inhalation studies of diesel exhaust particles are less sensitive than epidemiological studies, leading to higher risk estimates for lung cancer. Thus, evidence suggests that the chronic inhalation study in rats can be used for assessing lung cancer risk insoluble nanomaterials.

Reference

Saber AT, Poulsen SS, Hadrup N, Jacobsen NR, Vogel U. Commentary: The chronic inhalation study in rats for assessing lung cancer risk may be better than its reputation. Particle and Fibre Toxicology 2019;16:44.
doi: 10.1186/s12989-019-0330-4

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