Does self-assessed physical capacity predict development of low back pain among health care workers? A 2 year follow-up study

Tidsskriftartikel - 2013

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Study Design: Prospective cohort study.Objective: To determine the prognostic value of self-assessed physical capacity for the development of low back pain (LBP) among female health care workers without LBP.Summary of Background Data. High physical capacities in terms of strength, endurance, flexibility and balance are assumed to prevent LBP among persons with high physical work demands. However, the few existing studies investigating this relationship show contrasting findings.Methods: Female health care workers answered a questionnaire about physical capacities in 2004, and days with LBP in 2005 and 2006. The odds ratio (OR) for developing non-chronic (1-30 days the last 12 months) and persistent (>30 days the last 12 months) LBP in 2006 from self-assessed physical capacity were investigated with multi-adjusted logistic regressions among female health care workers without LBP in 2005 (n = 1,612).Results: Health care workers with low and medium physical capacities had increased risk of developing non-chronic LBP (OR = 1.52, (CI = 1.05-2.20) and OR = 1.37, (CI = 1.01-1.84) respectively), and health care workers with low physical capacity had an increased risk of developing persistent LBP (OR = 2.13, (CI = 1.15-3.96)), referencing those with high physical capacity.Conclusions: Self-assessed low physical capacity is a strong predictor for developing non-chronic and persistent LBP among pain-free female health care workers. Future intervention studies ought to investigate whether increased physical capacity, e.g. through exercise training prevents development of LBP among female health care workers.

Reference

Rasmussen CDN, Jørgensen MB, Clausen T, Andersen LL, Strøyer J, Holtermann A. Does self-assessed physical capacity predict development of low back pain among health care workers? A 2 year follow-up study. Spine 2013;38(3):272-276.
doi: 10.1097/BRS.0b013e31826981f3

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