Joint association of physical and psychosocial working conditions with risk of long-term sickness absence: Prospective cohort study with register follow-up [Epub ahead of print]

Tidsskriftartikel - 2020

Resume

Aims: The interplay between physical and psychosocial working conditions for the risk of developing poor health is not well understood. This study aimed to determine the joint association of physical and psychosocial working conditions with risk of long-term sickness absence (LTSA) in the general working population. Methods: Based on questionnaire responses about physical working conditions and psychosocial working conditions (influence at work, emotional demands, support from colleagues and support from managers) and two-year prospective follow-up in a national register on social transfer payments, we estimated the risk of incident LTSA of >30 days among 9544 employees without previous LTSA from the Danish Work Environment Cohort Study. The analyses were censored for all events of permanent labour market drop-out (retirement, disability pension, immigration or death) and controlled for potential confounders. Results: In the total cohort, more demanding physical working conditions were associated with risk of LTSA in a dose-response fashion (trend test, p<0.0001). The combination of poor overall psychosocial working conditions (index measure of influence at work, emotional demands, support from managers and support from colleagues) and hard physical working conditions showed the highest risk of LTSA. However, poor overall psychosocial working conditions did not interact with physical working conditions in the risk of LTSA (p=0.9677). Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that workplaces should strive to improve both psychosocial and physical work factors in order to ensure the health of workers.

Reference

Sundstrup E, Andersen LL. Joint association of physical and psychosocial working conditions with risk of long-term sickness absence: Prospective cohort study with register follow-up [Epub ahead of print]. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health 2020.
doi: 10.1177/1403494820936423

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