Emotional demands at work and the risk of clinical depression: A longitudinal study in the Danish public sector

Tidsskriftartikel - 2016

Resume

OBJECTIVE: This study is a 2-year follow-up study of different dimensions of work-related emotional demands as a predictor for clinical depression. METHODS: In a two-wave study, 3224 (72%) public employees from 474 work-units participated twice by filling in questionnaires. Sixty-two cases of clinical depression were diagnosed. Emotional demands were examined as perceived and content-related emotional demands, individually reported and work-unit based. Support, meaningful work, and enrichment were considered as potential effect modifiers. RESULTS: Individually reported perceived emotional demands predicted depression (odds ratio: 1.40; 95% confidence intervals: 1.02 to 1.92). The work-unit based odds ratio was in the same direction, though not significant. Content-related emotional demands did not predict depression. Support, meaningful work, and enrichment did not modify the results. CONCLUSIONS: The personal perception of emotional demands was a risk factor for clinical depression but specific emotionally demanding work tasks were not

Reference

Vammen M, Mikkelsen S, Hansen ÅM, Bonde J, Grynderup M, Kolstad H, Kaerlev L, Mors O, Rugulies RE, Thomsen J. Emotional demands at work and the risk of clinical depression: A longitudinal study in the Danish public sector. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine 2016;58(10):994-1001.
doi: 10.1097/JOM.0000000000000849

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